Overcoming an opiate addiction is challenging. Methadone is often used to ease discomfort. However, methadone is also highly addictive. Anyone serious about a life of recovery should be careful about the risk of a methadone addiction. Find out how methadone addiction develops, how to spot it and how it can be conquered with the right help and support.

Why Do People Use Methadone?

Man in black background with hands to head suffering a methadone addiction.Methadone is an opiate analgesic, which means that it targets some of the same areas of the brain as the more harmful opioid drugs. Rather than using heroin, a person addicted to heroin could rely on methadone. Methadone blocks any potential high from opioid drugs and reduces cravings. Together, these effects make a heroin relapse much less likely.

It is easy to see why methadone use would be preferable to the use of other more harmful opioid drugs. However, methadone still comes with plenty of risks. One of the biggest is that methadone can and does lead to addiction. If your goal is to live a life free from all addiction, relying on methadone might not be ideal.

Methadone is a prescription drug, and it is administered by medical professionals. Unfortunately, it is also widely abused. Some methadone users take multiple doses, rely on it for pain medication or mix it with other drugs. These actions are dangerous and cause severe problems.

How Can You Become Dependent on Methadone?

If you rely on methadone daily to deal with a heroin addiction, then a methadone addiction is likely to develop. Most people who use methadone are already struggling with an opioid addiction. Even if they are technically sober, they might still be dealing with the underlying issues that first contributed to drug addiction.

Every time you use methadone, you still impact the parts of the brain that wait for opioid receptor stimulation. Taking methadone continues the cycle. If you stop taking methadone all of a sudden, you might struggle with severe symptoms of withdrawal. Some users find that they also experience an increase in pain sensitivity.

A methadone addiction is even more likely if you are abusing the drug. Methadone for addiction relief should be taken once every 24 hours and then tapered down. Taking it more often, or taking multiple doses at once, will increase your tolerance and push you further into a dependency.

Spotting an Addiction to Methadone

Methadone does not cause extreme highs or euphoria. It is not considered to be a party drug. If you or someone you know relies on methadone, then an addiction is very likely.

An addiction is also indicated if the user can’t go a day or two without the drug. If you skip a day’s dose of methadone and you feel unwell, or you are distracted and can’t focus on anything but methadone, then you’re dependent on the drug.

Side Effects of Methadone Use

Methadone has far fewer negative side effects than many other opioid drugs. However, it can still cause a number of symptoms. Methadone can slow down your respiratory system, and it can become hard to breathe. This is especially true for people with pre-existing respiratory problems like asthma.

Methadone can also cause confusion. It may lead to cold, clammy skin, lethargy, low energy, and insomnia. It can act as a mild sedative, causing dizziness and a slowed heart rate. While this may be preferable to being high on heroin, it is certainly not a realistic or pleasant way to spend your life.

Overcoming Methadone Addiction at Serenity House Detox

Fortunately, you can overcome a methadone addiction. At Serenity House Detox, you can complete methadone detox and free yourself from the drug once and for all. As you flush the toxins from your body, you’ll regain independence and start thinking and moving without the influence of opioid drugs. Some of the advantages of detox that you can look forward to:

Methadone, a tool used to end heroin addiction, can also cause further problems. At Serenity House Detox, in West Palm Beach and Fort Lauderdale, Florida, you can gain support as you end your methadone addiction. Call 866-294-5306 to find out how to finally be completely drug-free.